Other Testing

Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV)

BVDV is not fatal to many cattle; a transient infection of the virus runs its course in just a few days.  However, cattle that are persistently infected (PI) with BVDV due to exposure to the virus in utero maintain a viral infection throughout their lives.  If a PI calf survives to live birth, it will continually shed the virus throughout its shortened life.

Exposure to PI cattle reaches beyond the cattle in a single pen or pasture to cattle in adjacent pens or pastures, therefore having the potential to infect and reinfect a large number of animals quickly. Regardless of age, all cattle are vulnerable to BVDV infection from PIs.A PI animal not only exposes its pen mates but also the cattle that have fence line contact.  According to a study of U.S. feedlot cattle, animals in the same and adjacent pens, that were exposed cattle.  The study also showed a 43% increased incidence of treatment for bovine respiratory tract disease (BRD) in non-PI cattle exposed to a PI animal.

BVDV challenges producer profitability and animal health with increased abortions, stillbirths and risk to healthy cattle.  Testing can save both Cattle and Money.  Testing all animals and removing PIs is the best way to decrease herd losses and reduce the financial impact of BVD-reported to be $30-$40/head (average) and up to $80/head across an entire herd.

Testing cost is approx. $3.50/head.
The same sample of blood can be used for additional BioPRYN testing.

Ovine Progressive Pneumonia (OPP)

Disease Transmission and Clinical Signs
Ovine Progressive Pneumonia (OPP) is a chronic disease of sheep caused by the OPP virus, which is closely related to the CAE virus.  Infected sheep can shed virus in secretions from the lungs and udder.  Animals typically become infected by consuming milk or colostrum containing the virus, though can be infected by inhaling droplets containing the virus.  Antibodies may not develop for 3-4 months or more following infection.  Sheep with OPP rarely show clinical signs of disease until they are at least 2 years old, and typically older than 4.  Clinical signs of OPP may include weight loss, increased breathing effort, hard bag, and possibly weakness, paralysis, or difficulty maintaining balance if infection occurs in the brain.  Some infected animals may never show signs of disease.

Diagnosis
Diagnosis in live animals is by testing blood samples for antibodies to OPP virus.  Because no vaccine exists and because infection is chronic, a positive test result in an adult indicates an infected sheep.  A negative test result in an exposed animal should be interpreted with caution because of the long incubation time for the virus.  Re-testing exposed sheep every 6-12 months for 2 years is recommended.  Lambs should not be tested before they are 6 months old, because circulating antibodies from their mothers make results difficult to interpret.  Blood testing for OPP and CAE antibodies is performed using an ELISA test.  The test does not distinguish between the two viruses.

Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis (CAE)

Disease Transmission and Clinical Signs
Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis (CAE) is a chronic disease of goats caused by the CAE virus, which is closely related to OPP virus.  Like OPP, CAE is usually transmitted by consumption of milk or colostrum infected with the virus, although transmission can also occur via contact with infected animals, or feed bunks or other equipment  contaminated with virus, which can be found in feces and lung fluids.  An animal may not develop antibodies to the virus for 2-10 months or longer after infection.  Many infected goats show no clinical signs of disease.  The most common clinical signs of infection are enlarged joints (typically knees), lameness, loss of condition, poor hair/coat, or hard bag.  Animals with infection in the brain may have balance difficulties, progressive weakness, paralysis, or exaggerated reflexes.  The brain form of disease is most common in kids.

Diagnosis
Diagnosis in live animals is by testing blood samples for antibodies to CAE virus.  Because no vaccine exists and because infection is chronic, a positive test result in an adult indicates an infected goat.  A negative result in an exposed animal should be interpreted with caution because of the long incubation time of the virus.  Re-testing exposed goats every 6-12 months for 2 years is recommended.  Kids should not be tested before they are 6 months old, because circulating antibodies from their mothers make results difficult to interpret.  Blood testing for OPP and CAE antibodies is performed using an ELISA test.  The test doesn't distinguish between the 2 viruses.

Testing cost approx.  $6.00/head.
The same sample of blood can be used for additional BioPRYN testing.